January Teacher of the Month

Introducing our January Teacher of the Month:

Ryan Chase!
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When Ryan was first introduced to Socrative, he immediately recognized that it was going to be a “game-changer” because of how it delivers real-time feedback from every student in the class. This ability to quickly see what his students are thinking now allows Ryan to tailor his teaching to the needs of each of his high school Bible classes. One of his favorite things about Socrative is how it gives him the ability to listen to all of his students, even those that are hesitant to speak up in class. He uses Short Answer Quick Question most often to gather his students’ thoughts or “quick writes” and sometimes projects their responses to allow students to hear from each other. He also uses the Multiple Choice and True/False Quick Question features to allow students to vote for their opinions or positions on different topics of discussion.

Ryan has also used Socrative to facilitate a scavenger hunt based upon research his students did in groups on different topics. The student groups created presentations on their topics, which became information “kiosks”, and Ryan gave the class a quiz that required information from each kiosk. Students went through each others’ presentations, learning about each student-researched topic and searching for the information to answer the quiz questions.

Ryan’s students also enjoy using Socrative, as it gives them a voice to provide feedback and influence the direction of the class. He often turns off the name requirement when asking for personal thoughts, views, or experiences in order to encourage more honest answers. He believes this practice has deepened the discussions that they share as a class and gives him access to student opinions that he would never otherwise have access to.

For teachers who are just getting started with Socrative, Ryan suggests using it with their current classroom practices. For example, he suggests instead of asking for a show of hands, use Socrative to take a poll. When doing quick writes, have students respond through Socrative instead of on paper. When asking practice questions, give them through Socrative so you can immediately gauge the class’ understanding. “The beautiful thing about Socrative is that it just gives teachers a quicker, more powerful, and more comprehensive tool to do the same things they’ve been doing”.

Back-Channeling with Socrative

What’s a Back Channel? Through a virtual room such as those available in Socrative, students may pose questions or comments regarding the material at hand in real-time, which the teacher may use to drive teaching and discussion. Classroom collaboration thus extends beyond segments of teaching followed by discussion, seamlessly melding the two, fostering participation and engagement.  Often done silently, it helps maintain class control while igniting and furthering collaboration.

Socrative short answer as a Back Channel!

Mr Vernon, a 6th grade Earth Science teacher wants to engage students during his overview lecture on plate tectonics. However, he has a lot of material to cover in a short amount of time. He turns to Socrative Short Answer to create a backchannel room so that students may submit questions throughout class.  It’s preset at anonymous but he likes to turn on the name feature for added accountability and the opportunity to directly support individual students. He also allows students to submit multiple times.

He asks students to “Surface questions or comments about this material”

In the last fifteen minutes of class, Mr. Vernon projects the questions and comments on the board and answers those that are the most common. Students learn what their peers are thinking and can compare it to their own understanding.  Mr. Vernon appreciates how he can clear up any areas of misunderstanding before the class ends.  In addition, he often adjusts homework as a result. Lastly, he downloads the Socrative report and reflects after class on how he could improve upon his class for next time.

 

Students as Questioners – Bloom’s Taxonomy

“An educated person today is someone who knows the right question to ask.”

Recently, I’ve been repeating this Ernest Boyer quote to myself.  It encapsulates so much in so few words. Many Socrative posts have focused on how teachers can foster discussions and help facilitate problem based thinking, inquiry and the surfacing of main ideas. Consequently, through modeling and drawing student attention to your questions, they are aware of how and why you are asking particular questions.

It’s time to pass the baton to the students and develop their abilities to ask the high quality questions.

Let’s call on our friend Benjamin Bloom for support.  

Bloom’s revised taxonomy is a great asset for making explicit your motivations behind classroom activities, assignments and discussion starters.  Furthermore, it helps build a common language and structure within your classroom.  As history has shown, this well-known, widely applied scheme filled a void and provided educators with one of the first systematic classifications of the processes of thinking and learning. The cumulative hierarchical framework consisting of six categories each requiring achievement of the prior skill or ability before the next, more complex one, remains easy to understand.

Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy

Remembering Retrieving, recognizing, reproducing and recalling relevant knowledge from long-term memory
Understanding Constructing meaning from oral, written, and graphic messages through interpreting, exemplifying, classifying, summarizing, inferring, comparing, and explaining
Applying Carrying out or using a procedure through executing or implementing
Analyzing Breaking material into constituent parts, determining how the parts relate to one another and to an overall structure or purpose through differentiating, organizing, and attributing
Evaluating Marking judgments based on criteria and standards through checking and critiquing
Creating Putting elements together to form a coherent or functional whole; reorganizing elements into a new pattern or structure through generating, planning, or producing

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The 5Ws and H – Questions, Questions, Questions!

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The infamous 5Ws and H have been an integral part of journalism, storytelling and an uncountable number of TV police dramas, (Law and Order being the best, of course).  

5Ws and H Table

Additionally, for years this structure has been helping students ask targeted questions as they dig deeper into factual information and uncover truths.  In the 21st century, this routine is more versatile and as important as ever. It’s at the core of problem solving in the office place, evaluating what’s what in cyberspace, and identifying causal relationships.

Whether an ELL teacher or a physics teacher, you’ll encounter numerous opportunities to cultivate your students’ abilities to mine for information, make sense of it, and then arrive at conclusions. So let’s support the development and acquisition of these cross-disciplinary skills through whole class discussion, practice and guided examples.

Build Understanding as a Class – Implementation Ideas

 

Use the Short Answer and Multiple Choice features to ask questions of the whole class and deconstruct each W and H together. Have students respond in complete sentences and then collaboratively decide which answers are the best and discuss why. 

Use the Short Answer Voting Feature to narrow the class’ choices and focus on reasoning. Ask students why they like their choices and identify the key criteria in a student defined rubric.  Continue the discussion into the other components of the routine.  

Create 2 to 3 question Quizzes for post reading assignments, experiments and research. Ask for different components of the routine each time as you put the 6 pieces together over time.  These can be either multiple choice, short response or a combination of the two. Have students work in small groups or pairs and discuss their choices.

Design a 5Ws and H quiz for easy and frequent use to check understanding and create discussion.

Reminder: How to make your own “Quiz” activity

Log into your account -> Click “Manage Quizzes” -> “Create a Quiz

Design the Quiz and select Save & Exit

The Quiz will now be available in your My Quizzes menu.

Share the SOC # with your community

 

Space Race vs. Other Classrooms and Schools!

Space Race 9 Rockets

 

 

 

 

 

We all know the fun of having a Space Race in your own class.

How about:

A Space Race against other classes within your school?

A Space Race against classes in the US?

A Space race against classes all over the world?

 

It’s quite simple! Here’s how:

1. Identify your competition and pick a date and time for the showdown!

Tip: Find other teachers within your PLN to Race

2. Co-construct an assessment and create it in Socrative

Tip: Enable sharing so each teacher can also import a copy using a SOC-#

3. Choose a screen sharing site

Tip: Google Hangouts and Skype work great!

4. Login in to your Socrative Account and the screen sharing site

5. Share your Socrative room number and screen sharing link

Tip: All classrooms can now view your Socrative screen in their own schools!

6. Have classrooms login in with 1 or more devices

Tip: 20 possible rockets across all classrooms

7. Select Space Race, Quiz and the number of teams

Tip: Choose a time limit if you want the furthest to win and not the fastest

8. GO!!!!!!!!! 

Tip: Take a final screenshot, Email the report to your colleagues and/or project it live on the screen!

Fun Socrative Quizzes for PD or Space Races

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Here is a list of quizzes we like to use for contests, demos and trainings.

Enjoy!

 

80′s Trivia (20 MC questions) SOC-12173811
- Ideal for Space Race
- Valuable to show how you switch from Rockets to data, select VIEW CHART on Reports pop-up after ending activity.

 

State Facts (2 MC, 1 Short Answer, 1 TF) SOC-10172020
- Ideal for Student Paced – Student Navigation, Teacher Paced
- Includes images

 

I Heart Polynomials (4 MC, explanations) SOC-10171986
- Ideal for Student Paced – Immediate Feedback
- Shows explanations
- includes superscripts
- Good for Math educators

 

World Cup 2014 – US Men’s National Team (3MC, 1 SA, 1 TF) SOC-10171977
- Ideal for Student Paced – Student Navigation, Teacher Paced
- Images
- Fill in the blank gradable short answer

 

Connect, Extend, Challenge (3 SA) SOC-10171982
- Ideal for Student Paced – Student Navigation
- It’s a thinking Routine

 

Subject Verb Agreement (4 MC) SOC-10172022
- Ideal for Student Paced – Student Navigation, Teacher Paced
- Good for ELA educators

 

Red Sox 2004 (4 MC) SOC-10172016
- Ideal for Student Paced – Student Navigation, Teacher Paced
- Good for baseball fans with great taste

 

New to Socrative? Get your feet wet with a simple activity!

Trying a new technology can feel a bit like the first day of school – you’re excited by all the possibilities, but nervous that you won’t get along with your new classmate! Take some of the pressure off by using one of these quick and reliable Socrative activities to get started:

Use a Multiple Choice Quick Question as a likert scale to gauge your students’ understanding or opinion on a topic:

  1. From your Dashboard click Quick Question.

  2. Select Multiple Choice and options A through E will be sent to your students.
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  3. Ask your question out loud. Some examples:

    • How well did you understand the homework? A = not at all, E = totally got it

    • Do you agree with the main character’s actions? A = strongly disagree, E = strongly agree

    • Would you like to do that activity again? A = definitely not, E = yes please!

  4. Project your screen so students can see the anonymous data populate your screen in real-time. Then discuss the results!

Want to send another Quick Question? Click on the question type you want at the bottom of your screen, and it will automatically send to your students.

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Use True/False Quick Questions to conduct fast knowledge checks:

  1. From your Dashboard click Quick Question.

  2. Select True/False and those two options will be sent to you students.

  3. Ask your question aloud. Some examples:

    • Two negative numbers multiplied together make a positive.

    • “Desayuno” translates to “lunch”.

    • Maria is the protagonist in this story.

  4. Project your screen so students can see the anonymous data populate your screen in real-time. Then discuss the results!
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Use Short Answer Quick Questions to gather authentic examples of student work for discussion:

  1. From your Dashboard click Quick Question.

  2. Select Short Answer and you will see your advanced options.

  3. Type in your question or ask your question aloud. Some examples:

    • When have you seen combustion occur in real life?

    • What do you think the raven represents in the poem?

    • Use the vocabulary word in a full sentence.

  4. Click Start and your students will receive a text box to enter their response, as well as the question if you chose to type it in.

  5. Project your screen to discuss the class’ responses. The answers will automatically show up anonymously to facilitate a comfortable and low-pressure discussion. Click the Show Names button if you prefer to show each student’s name with their answer.
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  6. BONUS: Once all the responses are in, click Start Vote to have students vote on their favorite response!

EVIDENTIAL REASONING: Visible Thinking Routine

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What Makes You Say That?

As you know, Socrative is a tool that reports what your students know. However, did you know that Socrative can also provide information on how your students are thinking? For example, after a science lesson, a teacher may use a Socrative quiz to ask, “Will a penny, with a density of 2g/ml float in water?” Based upon the student responses, the teacher will be able to see who responded correctly.Then, she may ask, “Please explain your answer to question 1″.Here’s where another component of student thinking comes in.  Based upon this second round of responses, the teacher will be able to see how her students understand (or misunderstand) the concept of density. Using Socrative will allow her to target any remaining misunderstandings in her ongoing instruction.This type of teaching is based upon research on student thinking at Harvard’s Project Zero. It encourages students to share and explain their perspectives by asking,

  • What’s going on?
  • What do you see?
  • What do you know?
  • What makes you say that?

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Join Our Sharing Community!

Every teacher knows that other teachers are frequently the best resource for classroom planning.  Collaboration among teachers has been shown not only to save time and make work more efficient, but also to result in better student outcomes.  Because we know teacher collaboration is so important, we want to help our community of 1 million teachers work together. We have reorganized over 1,000 teacher-made quizzes in our updated Socrative Shared Quiz List!

 Our goal is to make it easier than ever for our teachers to collaborate by finding, sharing, remixing, and building a community around formative assessments.

 

Find a Quiz

Looking for ideas about how to formatively assess your students’ understanding during an upcoming lesson? In a pinch and need a quiz to review yesterday’s content? Head into the Shared Quiz List and find an activity that other Socrative teachers have used! Importing quizzes created by other teachers is a great way to learn from what others are doing with the added bonus of saving yourself some time. Learn how to import a quiz here!

 

Share a Quiz

If you’ve created an engaging, effective activity for checking your students understanding, please share! By adding to the Shared Quiz List, you can have an impact far beyond the four walls of your classroom. Enter as much information as you can about your quiz so that its purpose and value are clear to others. Socrative teachers will be grateful when they’re able to easily find and use your content, and so will their students!

 

Remix a Quiz

When we collaborate to create great content, our students benefit. When you find a quiz, make adjustments based on what you know is best for students. Then, share your remixed quiz! Add a quick note to let others know about the changes you made, and let the collaboration continue.

 

Build a Community

Engaging in a community of practice helps us be the best educators we can be. You and your colleagues can share SOC codes on email lists, Facebook groups, Pinterest boards, and other social media forums. You can also build community outside your immediate network by tweeting your content with the tag #socshare. Finding, sharing, remixing, and talking about formative assessments with the Socrative community helps us all improve our practice and and enhance our students’ learning.

 

We hope that you will find the updated shared quiz list helpful. Know that we are continuing to work on future plans to expand upon options for sharing and collaborating as a Socrative community; this shared quiz list is only one small step.  Stay tuned to learn more about future improvements!

 

3 Engaging Uses of Open Response

One of our favorite features is Quick Question – Short Answer.  With a few quick clicks, you can use short answer to ask a question, then gather, visualize and discuss a whole class’ open responses.  You could even have students VOTE on the responses!  

1. Gather Student Questions:

As students settle into their seats have them enter a question based on last night’s homework or your current unit.  You can quickly clear up any misunderstanding before moving on to that day’s agenda. By enabling each student to respond, you can see common questions that are applicable to a larger number of students. Use the VOTE feature to have them prioritize what you answer!

Remember – student questions project anonymously, but you can toggle on “show name” and also have a report afterward which tells who said what.  Overall, students are less fearful of asking a question anonymously.

This is also a great tool to use at the end of class. As students start to pack up, open a short answer to gather any points of confusion to incorporate into your plan for the next day, or ask a question based on that day’s content to see what your students have learned!

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2. Vocabulary

In every class, there are key vocabulary items that students need to master. Pose a vocabulary word in short answer and ask students to use that word in a sentence, or respond with the definition.

3. Foreign Language

There are multiple ways to allow students to show their understanding in a second language classroom.

- Present students with a sentence and ask them to translate

- Present students with a sentence and ask them to write a follow-on sentence

- Have students use a key vocabulary term in a sentence (verbs, nouns, adjectives etc.)

 

How Quick Question – Short Answer Works:

1. From your Teacher Dashboard select “Quick Question”

2. Select the “Short Answer” on the right

3. Type a Question into the text field (optional)

4. Choose whether you would like a SINGLE or UNLIMITED responses from your Students

5. Choose whether you would like students to be ANONYMOUS or REQUIRE their name. (Either way, all responses initially display on your screen anonymously)  

6. Select start!

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